New Zealand, wine

Seresin: Biodynamics on Display

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I was very excited to visit Seresin Estate in the Marlborough region of New Zealand to get a fuller understanding of biodynamics. What is biodynamics? It’s an approach to agriculture, the earth, and the role of people on this planet that’s a blend of science, organic farming, sustainability, and (frankly) a bit of mysticism. As more and more wineries convert from interventionist and chemical-based agriculture to biodynamics, I’m reading a lot about it but haven’t seen it in practice. I know that some of the world’s top wines are made from vineyards farmed on biodynamic principles, so there must be something to it.

Colin at Seresin

My guide for this journey was Estate Manager Colin Ross. A perpetual source of enthusiasm, knowledge, passion, and good humor, I could not have asked for a better host to lead me through Seresin. We just toured around the vineyard while Colin showed me one of their piles of composted manure, as well as a Clydesdale that pulls a sprayer behind him full of natural rather than chemical treatments for the vines.

A big part of biodynamics is treating soil and vines with various preparations that might be based in a combination of composted elements and teas that put back vital nutrients in the soil, maintain a balanced ecosystem, and treat/prevent pests and disease. Rather than spray with chemicals to keep things out, biodynamics strives to work with natural ingredients that promote health and balance. Probably the biggest snickering and scoffing about biodynamics concerns the practice of burying cow horns filled with preparations; most critics hone in on that one point because it’s an easy target. Yeah, it sounds a little crazy, but it’s a small part of a whole system of stewardship of the land that has some tangible and concrete applications to all types of agriculture.

Cow Horns.

What really struck me is the distinction that Colin is an Estate Manager, not just a Vineyard Manager. Chickens, pigs, vegetables, and fruits are all over the place. (Staff meals must be pretty incredible here. Just check out all the garlic, shallots, and onions! Wowzers!)

Garlic

Seresin gets most of its compost form one source: Olga. This cow also provides a bit of milk for cheese-making. Yours truly even helped in the process, milking a cow for the first time:

Me Milking Olga

So after working my ass off, I was rewarded with some wine tasting. Special mention has to go to the Rachel and Leah Pinot Noirs, which were fabulously pure, balanced, and complex. Damn hard to spit while tasting. (So I opted to drink them.)

Seresin Pinot Noir

So while biodynamics has its detractors, it’s hard to argue with the results in the bottle. I’m willing to take that leap of faith.

View from Winery

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2 thoughts on “Seresin: Biodynamics on Display

  1. Rob Bahnsen says:

    Leave it to you to post a candid of you grabbing a teat! Hope you’re having a good time (sounds like it’s aces) Dinner, dinner, dinner and a lot of wine when you return…no excuses!

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