A Loire Chateau Lunch

muscadet 054
I would have been content just to stroll through the gate at Chateau l’Oiseliniere, gaze at this stately, elegant, iconic home, and turn around and head directly back to the van. It was, however, an embarrassment of riches as I as able to tour the surrounding vineyards, sample a variety of delicious Muscadets, and have one of the most charming home-cooked lunches imaginable. If I didn’t have the photos to corroborate the previous two sentences, I might have though it was all a reverie brought on by my penchant for 19th Century French literature. So rather than gauzy, filtered memories, I have some sharp images to share.

muscadet 064
Above is proprietor Georges Verdier showing us that flowering has begun on the Melon de Bourgogne vines, which means that harvest should begin in about 90 days. Our lesson in grape growing over, it was time to sample the fruits of his labor. We found out that Muscadet is not only popular with those of us who love crisp, dry, refreshing white wines, but also (strangely enough) with felines:

muscadet 093
Our appetites primed by a dizzying array of bracing, memorable Muscadets, we went into the dining room to find a black olive, spinach, and onion tart with a whole wheat crust. This was no quiche; it had just enough binder to keep it together. I thought this would be more of a dish for a rosé, but the briny black olives brought out the salty, mineral-tinged aspect of the Muscadet. Brilliant.

muscadet 101
Next it was time for some white asparagus. I found myself counting my blessings for being in the Loire in time for both strawberry and asparagus season. We enjoyed a white asparagus custard surrounded by a green pea puree. Whoever says asparagus is difficult to pair with wine needs to try it with a richer-style, vegetable-loving Muscadet.

muscadet 106
We finished with langoustines atop a simple salad of garden-fresh vegetables. This seemed to be the penultimate dish to have with Muscadet, which is simply one of the finest wines to have with seafood, period.

muscadet 112
Here is the ubiquitous “I was there” photo that I include not out of vanity but to illustrate I have pen and paper by my side, dutifully taking notes. And although you can’t see it, I have actually glued myself to the chair I am sitting in, as I thought this was the most rational plan to make sure I never had to leave. Please forward my mail care of Chateau l’Oiseliniere.

muscadet 105

Full disclosure: I am a sponsored guest of the Loire Valley Wine Bureau on this trip.

Vermouth: Imbibe Imbue

Imbue VermouthI’ll admit to not paying much attention to vermouth. All I knew is that I like a little dry in my martini and a little sweet in my Manhattan. But after recently trying imbue vermouth, I think I may have found my new favorite drink.

A wonderfully fresh and fragrant blend of Pinot Gris, brandy, and an assortment of botanicals, imbue does (as promised) have a wonderfully balanced bittersweet quality. Even better, it’s made right here in the Pacific Northwest; both the wine and the brandy are from Oregon. I though it was great just chilled and poured into a glass, but I’m envisioning a summer of imbue with rocks, a splash of soda, and a twist of orange. I’ll have to break this news to white, sparkling, and even rosé (gasp!) wine gently; they won’t take too kindly having to step aside for the new kid on the block.

I highly recommend picking up a bottle and creating your own cocktails with this delicious vermouth. What drinks would you make with a bottle of imbue?

Long Shadows Riesling Forever

Poet's Leap
The red wines produced by Long Shadows, an innovative program started by Allen Shoup, brings together some of the heaviest-hitting names in winemaking from all over the world to produce wines made with Washington grapes. As Gilles Nicault, Director of Winemaking and Viticulture (who was our guest for a recent tasting of Long Shadow’s releases) explained, visiting winemakers “come to Washington and bring their savoir-faire.”

While the reds seem to get the lion’s share of the attention, I was truly impressed with the quality of the Rieslings. The Long Shadow’s “Poet’s Leap” is a collaboration with Armand Diel of Germany’s Schlossgut Diel. Its refreshing qualities and nice, zippy acidity on the finish were so pleasing. The 2009 is the best version of this Riesling I’ve tasted. A definite porch-pounder for those hot summer months. Grab some sushi or some spicy Asian fare. (Then call me; I’ll be right over.)

The real stunner, however, was the 2008 Botrytis Riesling, a dessert wine. Botrytis is often called “Noble Rot” as grapes affected by it make arguably the world’s most famous dessert wine, Sauternes. All other kinds of rot, however, just make a wine that is…rotten. Botrytis helps concentrate the juice and flavor of the grapes so that by the time you harvest it, you get a juice more akin to nectar. As Gilles commented, the sugar levels are so high for this wine that when it gets into the tank it “ferments like maple syrup.” In some logic-defying manner, while there is an insane amount of sugar crammed into every slender bottle, it’s not cloyingly sweet. (Like, for example, a Jolly Rancher.) There is enough acidity on the finish (the looooong finish) to provide a bit of refreshment. Add this to gorgeous aromatics and you have a dessert wine that is one to sip, savor, and repeat. Just get some blue cheese and some thin slices of apple. (And, seriously, get a hold of me via phone, fax, text, e-mail, Twitter, Facebook, Skype, carrier pigeon, whatevs. I will totes be there.)

Here’s my real-time reaction to the Botrytis Riesling on Twitter:

Apparently I wasn’t the only one impressed; Annie, a Washington wine enthusiast (to put it mildly) who was also attending our Long Shadows seminar, responded:

So enjoy those Long Shadows reds, but don’t sleep on the Rieslings!